DIY – How to Trim Tree Branches Yourself | Davey Blog

Pruning small trees is a perfectly manageable DIY project. You’ll need a sharp pruning tool and the ability to eyeball the cutting spot, which is near the branch collar. Don’t cut the branch collar itself. Keep any branches growing at a 2 o’clock or 10 o’clock angle from the trunk. Make sure you don’t remove more than 25% of a tree’s canopy, as this can threaten its health. Nor should you cut the top off of a tree. And don’t try to prune large trees or heavy branches. Reserve those jobs for landscaping professionals.

Key Takeaways:

  • Don’t try to prune a tree yourself if you have to use a ladder or get too close to power lines — the safety risk isn’t worth it.
  • Try not to cut directly on the branch collar, which is where the trunk and the branch intersect.
  • Focus on pruning dead branches, water sprouts and branches emanating from the roots or base of the tree.

“Large pruning jobs should absolutely be left to a professional, but trimming small branches and trees is perfectly manageable. Yes, you can learn how to prune a small tree all on your own!”

Read more: http://blog.davey.com/2019/03/diy-how-to-trim-tree-branches-yourself/

The Best Advice on DIY Tree Removal and Cutting

Tree falling can be dangerous, especially if you do it yourself. But, there are a few techniques that DIY landscapers can use to remove trees. As a common rule, if you need to use a ladder, then the tree should be removed by a professional. Also, amateur landscapers shouldn’t try to pull up stumps using a truck, as there are a lot of safety issues involved. If the tree is small enough though, it’s okay to cut it down and wiggle the roots out.

Key Takeaways:

  • If you need a ladder to reach and remove tree limbs, that’s a sign that the tree is too large for you to remove on your own.
  • Trying to uproot a tree stump with your truck is dangerous to both nearby structures and the truck.
  • If removing a small tree yourself, assume you’ll have to dig six inches for every one inch thick the tree trunk is.

“While there are many landscape projects you can safely and easily DIY, tree removal is one that is not worth the money you save.”

Read more: http://blog.davey.com/2017/07/the-best-advice-on-diy-tree-removal-and-cutting/

8 Things You Need to Prep Your Home for Fall: Do You Have Them All?

Fall is an ideal time for winterizing and cleaning. Several tools and household items can help the process, save money, and improve quality of life. A pressure washer can easily clean and give surfaces new life. Insulated doors can save on Electric bills and keep things warm. Leaf blowers can save you time spent on raking. As you move indoors for the cold weather and spend more time in the house, carpet and furniture cleaners, air filters, and organizers can improve your living area.

Key Takeaways:

  • You can get a 2000 psi pressure washer that’s perfect for cleaning your deck, driveway and other exterior spaces.
  • Instead of shelling out tons of money on a leaf blower you can rent on to get your gutters cleaned
  • An air purifier unit, complete with a HEPA filter, can help you make sure your indoor air is clean.

“With its two-layer steel construction, the door provides peace of mind that your home is more secure.”

Read more: https://www.realtor.com/news/trends/things-you-need-to-prep-your-home-for-fall/

Ready for the cool down – Lawn & Landscape

At the end of summer, most lawns of taken a beating from the heat and the sunlight, so during the fall, it’s important for homeowners to take preventative steps to get their yards ready for next year. Homeowners should be aware about the potential for fungal diseases within their lawn, and may need to spray fungicide in the autumn. Other fall lawn care tips include, but are not limited to, applying pesticides, aerating, and proper fertilizer treatments.

Key Takeaways:

  • Lawns take on a lot of stress throughout the summer and need to be repaired and cared for in the fall.
  • It depends a lot on the weather and the area if you want to apply a fungicide every year. If your yard has chronic problems, do this yearly.
  • Aerating and overseeding lawns help immensely because it will be all new grass, basically no insects and no disease.

“The more scientific we are about this, the better the results and the healthier the soil is,” he says. “If the soil isn’t happy, the lawn isn’t happy.”

Read more: https://www.lawnandlandscape.com/article/ready-for-the-cool-down/

Checklist: Do this fall yard work now, reap benefits next spring – Valley News

Many preparations can be made in autumn, to prepare the lawn for the next spring and summer. Mulching can give the lawn more nutrients over the winter. Aeration can give water and air deep in the soil. Trees and shrubs should be trimmed to prepare for snow and winds. The branches should be cut back to a safe distance from wires and the house. Lawn and garden power equipment should be winterized, kept safe from the winter in a shed or garage.

Key Takeaways:

  • Continue mowing grass to make it more resistant against disease and field mice infestation.
  • Mulch fallen leaves to provide soil with rich nutrients throughout the winter months.
  • Winterize and prep all outdoor power equipment for storage throughout the off season.

“OPEI is an international trade association representing power equipment, small engine, utility vehicle, golf car and personal transport vehicle manufacturers and suppliers.”

Read more: https://www.myvalleynews.com/checklist-do-this-fall-yard-work-now-reap-benefits-next-spring/